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F19 UGP-1 Residency has ended

Abenaki Acknowledgement

We acknowledge this land we sit on and the people whose home this is. This land is the land of the aboriginal Abenaki people who have lived here for over 12,900 years. The Abenaki people faced centuries of war and disease stemming from the European invasion, continued eradication pre and post American Revolution and sterilization as a result of the Vermont Eugenics laws in the 20th century. The resilience and strength of the Abenaki people continues to manifest itself today in their protection of the land and their communities. As members of the Missisquoi Tribe of the Abenaki Nation shared with us, “We will always stand up and protect our aboriginal title.


Apocalypse, Futurity, and (Re)Making the World:

Are We at the Beginning, the End or Somewhere Else? 


To see that your life is a story
while you’re in the middle of living it

may be a help to living it well.

-Ursula K. LeGuin


This is a turbulent time for the planet, the United States, and Goddard College. Challenges abound. Uncertainty is commonplace. And we are being asked to (re)consider who we are, what we believe, and what our future will be. 


Our theme for this residency was created as a call to question where you are in any of the particular stories in which you exist and consider how that questioning changes what is possible.  How does your worldview open or foreclose possibilities? What stories have you been holding about where the planet, the United States, and Goddard College are in their life cycles? How do those stories inform your decision-making as a person, community member, artist/writer, scholar, activist, learner, healer, practitioner, etc.? What are the sources of your stories/worldview? How does the location of those sources affect the kinds of stories that appear in and are embraced within those spaces? What makes it possible to think outside of one’s personal story in order to understand other stories? What skills are required in navigating these stories and the worlds they create? 


Keeping these questions in mind and heart, we invite you to utilize the creative and intellectual resources of your degree track to propose answers to the residency theme as well as visions for what the planet, the United States, and/or Goddard College could look like in the future.


A NOTE ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY: To document residency activities, we may take photographs of events. If you do not wish to have your photograph taken, please inform the photographer. If you are photographing people, please check with the group or individuals to see if anyone objects to being photographed.

Social Justice Statement
Residency Notices
UGP Learning and Epistemology Statement
UGP 1 Semester Dates & Deadlines
Wednesday, August 28 • 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Worldview and Sustainability: Analyzing Environmental Discourses

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Sustainability means different things to different people.  Some of these differences are the result of people having different underlying worldviews.  In his book, "The Politics of the Earth:  Environmental Discourses," John S. Dryzek uses discourse analysis to critically analyze and categorize 10 different environmental discourses that are often in conflict.  We'll explore his model and discuss how it might help us to understand different theories of sustainability and their underlying worldviews.   In the process, we'll reflect on our own understanding of sustainability and how it has been shaped by our own worldview, social identities and experiences.



Speakers
avatar for Karen Stupski

Karen Stupski

Faculty/Program Coordinator, Goddard College
Office: CC 208, x819. Advising: CC 208


Wednesday August 28, 2019 4:30pm - 6:00pm
CC207 Media Room

Attendees (4)